Aquaculture by-product meal as a fishmeal replacer in African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) diet: Effects on serum biochemistry, innate immune response, and oxidative stress markers

Antioxidants Superoxide dismutase Blood electrolytes Blood glucose Catalase.

Authors

  • Wasiu Adeyemi Jimoh
    jimoh.wa@unilorin.edu.ng
    Department of Aquaculture and Fisheries, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Ilorin, PMB 1515, Ilorin, Nigeria.
  • Ahmed Ayodeji Ayeloja Department of Aquaculture and Fisheries, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Ilorin, PMB 1515, Ilorin, Nigeria.
  • Isioma Emmanuel Mowete Department of Aquaculture and Fisheries, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Ilorin, PMB 1515, Ilorin, Nigeria.
  • Yusuf Olatunji Yusuf Department of Aquaculture and Fisheries, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Ilorin, PMB 1515, Ilorin, Nigeria.
  • Musa Idi-Ogede Abubakar Department of Aquaculture and Fisheries, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Ilorin, PMB 1515, Ilorin, Nigeria.
June 14, 2022

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The effect of feeding aquaculture by-product meal (ABP) to African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) was investigated in a 56-day feeding trial using serum biochemistry, innate immune response, and oxidative stress markers as indices of assessment. Fishmeal protein in control diets was replaced at a rate of 15, 30, 45, and 60% by aquaculture by-product meal protein. Each experimental diet was randomly distributed into triplicate tanks containing catfish fingerlings (n = 15 fingerlings/replicate, 5.58±0.05 g). The primary haematological parameters (haemoglobin, packed cell volume, red blood cell count) and secondary haematological parameters (MCH, MCV, and MCHC) were similar with the control. The white blood cell count and its differential of the fish group fed ABP meal was numerically higher than control but not significant, except in fish fed D30T that had high lymphocyte count. The platelet count in all the dietary groups was similar. There was no significant variation in some of the serum biochemistry parameters: total protein, albumin, globulin and albumin/globulin ratio, urea, HDL-C and LDL-C. Creatinine values of the D60T fed group were significantly higher than all other dietary treatment groups including the control. Triglyceride's level was statistically similar with control up to 30% replacement level, while there were no significant variations in the cholesterol levels of the blood of C. gariepinus fed the different dietary treatments. Except for catalase, there were no significant differences in other oxidative stress biomarkers under study, primarily SOD, GSH, and GPx. Catalase enzyme activities of the fish group fed D30T were statistically higher than other fed groups. Some serum electrolytes, such as calcium and chloride ions of the differently fed fish groups, were not significantly different. Lastly, serum potassium ions were significantly higher among D60T fed group though statistically similar to D45T-fed group. No stress conditions were recorded among the dietary groups.  These results showed that the health status and immunity of African catfish were not degraded by feeding aquaculture by-product meal to the fish.