Structure and health status of the sand crab, Emerita taiwanesis Hsueh, 2015 from Sangchan Beach, Thailand: The histopathological approach

Bioindicator Carb Gill Health Histopathology Thailand

Authors

  • Sinlapachai Senarat
    sinlapachai.s@rmutsv.ac.th
    Department of Marine Science and Environment, Faculty of Science and Fisheries Technology, Rajamangala University of Technology Srivijaya, Trang campus, Trang, 92150, Thailand.
  • Natthakitt To-orn Program of Fisheries Science, Faculty of Agricultural Technology and Agro-Industry, Rajamangala University of Technology Suvarnabhumi, Ayutthaya 13000, Thailand.
  • Chanyut Sudtongkong Department of Marine Science and Environment, Faculty of Science and Fisheries Technology, Rajamangala University of Technology Srivijaya, Trang campus, Trang, 92150, Thailand.
  • Gen Kaneko College of Natural and Applied Science, University of Houston-Victoria, Victoria, Texas 77901, USA.
  • Natthawut Charoenphon Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medical Science, Naresuan University, 65000 Thailand.
  • Somrudee Meprasert Jitpraphai Department of Marine Science, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand.
  • Jes Kettratad Department of Marine Science, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand.
June 25, 2022

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Although the impacts of environmental problems on aquatic organisms have been broadly reported in Thailand, the literature has not covered the sand crab, Emerita taiwanesis Hsueh, 2015. In this study, we focused on the structure and health status of E. taiwanesis, an economically important crab species, living close to human activity areas in Sangchan Beach, Rayong Province, Thailand. A total of 60 individuals were collected from the conservation and restoration of coastal resource project in Ban Rue Leg Kao Yod-based participatory during December 2016 – January 2017. We identified histopathological changes in the gill structure, but not in other vital organs, including ganglion, stomach, intestine, hepatopancreas and muscular bundles. The histological alterations in the gill include hematocyte infiltration, pyknotic nuclei and degeneration of pillar cells in the gill (50% prevalence), suggesting that the gill is a sensitive organ to environmental changes. Our observation provided a better understanding of E. taiwanesis morphology and its overall healthy state on Sangchan Beach. Additionally, we suggest that the sand crab would be a suitable sentinel species for monitoring the environment of coastal areas in Thailand.